The Camps of Summer Part II

By Frank Ruggiero (frank@mountaintimes.com)



Article Published: May. 14 | Modified: May. 14
The Camps of Summer Part II

Kyle Scannell of Greensboro carefully makes his way across a rope on the Discovery Course with Rock Dimensions.
File photo



Snow days have resulted in a longer school year, meaning area children will have only so much time to cram in a summer’s worth of fun in the sun.

Fortunately, summer camps are here to help. As a follow-up to our summer camp roundup in April, here are some additional offerings:

High Country Volleyball Camp

Running June 14 to 17 at Watauga High School, High Country Volleyball Camp is designed for girls and boys ages 8 to 18. The camp runs over four days and features six three-hour training sessions: Saturday, June 14, 5 to 8 p.m.; Sunday, June 15, 1 to 4 p.m. and 5 to 8 p.m.; Monday, June 16, 9 a.m. to noon and 1 to 4 p.m.; and Tuesday, June 17, from 9 a.m. to noon. Cost is $180.

According to WHS volleyball coach Kris Hagaman, the camp will have groupings based on ability and age, from beginners to elite. Beginning players will focus on developing basic skills and learning initial team concepts, while high school junior varsity and varsity players will train at volleyball fundamentals “to strengthen the skills that make a successful high school player,” Hagaman said. “These players will also be exposed to more in-depth team concepts and strategies.”

A registration brochure is available online at http://wataugasd.whs.schoolfusion.us. Simply follow the links for WHS athletic summer camps, or contact Hagaman at (hagamank@watauga.k12.nc.us) for more information.



Camp Mountaintop Discovery

Camp Mountaintop Discovery is a non-competitive, coed youth empowerment and adventure camp located on 380 acres of mountaintop property in Boone.

According to CMD’s Taryn Longberry, the camp “provides a unique opportunity for self-discovery, relationship building, community awareness, outdoor adventure and developing a healthy and joyful lifestyle.”

Activities include Youth Empowerment Seminars (YES!) and All Around Training and Excellence (ART Excel) programs, which Longberry said “provide a dynamic and fun experience that challenges teens to take responsibility for their life and provides a comprehensive set of practical tools for releasing stress, mastering emotions and raising self-awareness.”

Longberry said the programs are designed to address teenagers’ physical, mental, social and emotional development, while introducing them to breathing techniques to relieve stress and focus the mind. They’ll include experiential processes to help teens develop problem-solving strategies, she said, while dynamic group discussions will help them feel at ease in challenging situations, helping them to boost their confidence and withstand criticism and peer pressure.

These programs will coincide with more traditional outdoor camping excursions, including waterfall hikes, rock climbing, river tubing, gem mining, swimming and more.

As part of The Art of Living Foundation, a nonprofit humanitarian organization founded in 1981 by spiritual leader Sri Sri Ravi Shankar, Camp Mountaintop Discovery will take place at the organizations Art of Living Center near Boone. As such, campers will enjoy “simplistic, clean and comfortable accommodations” in the center’s retreat-style buildings, Longberry said. Plus, the property features trails and woods aplenty for outdoor adventure, along with other amenities, like a swimming hole, bonfire pit, playground, yoga rooms, dining hall and more.

“Our staff are highly trained in working with youth in a camp atmosphere,” Longberry said, noting that they’re trained in CPR and First Aid. “Safety is our first priority at Camp Mountaintop Discovery. Coming in a close second is fun! We pride ourselves in dedicated staff who absolutely love working with youth and sometimes have more fun than the campers themselves. Is that possible?”

Camp Mountaintop Discovery costs $849 per session, which includes eight days and seven nights. Intended for children ages 8 through 17, the sessions run July 26 to Aug. 2 for ages 14 to 17 and Aug. 3 to 10 for ages 8 to 13. For more information, visit http://www.campmountaintop.org, or call (800) 392-6870.



Avery County 4-H


Avery County 4-H Youth Development has one word for summer campers: WOW.

With assistance from WAMY Community Action, Avery County Schools, Avery Parks and Recreation and the Avery County Cooperative Extension Service, the group’s 4-H Summer WOW Program is now enrolling for its 2014 summer. Now in its 14th year, the program offers activities focused on the four Hs of 4-H: “Head to clearer thinking, Hearts to greater loyalty, Hands to larger service and Health to better living for club, community, country and world.”

Designed for ages 5 to 13, activities include trips to the Catawba Science Center, Hickory Crawdads and Barter Theatre, with other programs rounding out the itinerary, like working in a community garden, service learning, hiking, swimming, martial arts, trout fishing and more.

Based out of Newland Elementary School, camp will run June 23 to Aug. 1, from 7:30 a.m. to 5:30 p.m. Monday through Friday. The cost is an all-inclusive $25 per day, although some participants may be eligible for financial assistance through the Department of Social Services. Cost includes a nutritious breakfast, lunch and snacks each day, as well as transportation from two school sites in the morning and afternoon. 4-H also offers community members the chance to sponsor trips.

For more information, visit http://avery.ces.ncsu.edu, or contact Bobbie Willard, 4-H and extension agent with Avery Cooperative Extension, at (828) 733-8270.



Rock Dimensions Climbing Adventure Camp

For the High Country’s younger adventurers, Boone-based Rock Dimensions is offering a series of climbing camps.

Climbing & Adventure Camp is intended for ages 8 and older. Sessions begin at the climbing tower at Rock Dimensions and Footsloggers in downtown Boone, before campers move to explore sites in Blowing Rock, Linville Gorge and other areas across the High Country. Activities include rock climbing, rappelling, caving and a ropes challenge course.

Camp dates are June 23 to 27, July 7 to 11, July 21 to 25 and Aug. 4 to 8. The cost is $475 per person for the full week and includes a Rock Dimension T-shirt. Partial week options are available at a pro-rated cost, and family discounts will be offered for 2 or more siblings. For more information, call (828) 265-3544.

The Intermediate Climb Camp is geared toward ages 11 and older, specifically campers who have a little more experience climbing outdoors. According to Rock Dimensions, participants will experience a variety of climbing styles, including toproping, traditional single-pitch, multi-pitch, bouldering and sport climbing, and “the last day will culminate in a fun and challenging high ropes/challenge course experience.”

Intermediate camp has two sessions: July 14 to 18 and July 28 to Aug. 1. The cost is $500 for the full week, although partial week options are available at a pro-rated cost.

For both beginner and intermediate camps, campers bring their own lunch, water, snacks, clothing and footwear appropriate for the activity. Transportation and all climbing, caving and challenge course equipment will be provided. Both camps run from 8:30 a.m. to 4:30 p.m. each day in sessions.

To register, or for more information, call (828) 265-3544, email (jenny@rockdimensions.com) , or visit http://www.rockdimensions.com.



Summer Enrichment Series

Brain Food Boone and The Woodlands Barbecue & Pickin’ Parlor are cooking up activities to keep children’s minds active during summer break.

As such, Brain Food Boone is offering the Summer Enrichment Series, with a focus on science and social studies. But this isn’t any normal lesson. Organizer Amy Forrester said the programs are designed to feature “fun and dynamic lessons to keep skills sharp over the summer.”

With a small group environment — maximum of nine children and two teachers — the camp strives to never deliver the same lesson twice, with subjects including conversation, environmental issues, animal habitats and citizenship, with language arts and math integrated into each.

Sessions are: June 15, 10 a.m. to noon (rising first- and second-graders) and 1 to 3 p.m. (rising third- and fourth-graders); June 18, 10 a.m. to noon (rising first- and second-graders) and 1 to 3 p.m. (rising third- and fourth-graders); June 23, 10 a.m. to noon (rising fifth- and sixth-graders) and 1 to 3 p.m. (rising first- and second-graders); June 25, 10 a.m. to noon (rising fifth- and sixth-graders) and 1 to 3 p.m. (rising first- and second-graders); June 30, 10 a.m. to noon (rising third- and fourth-graders) and 1 to 3 p.m. (rising fifth- and sixth-graders); July 2, 10 a.m. to noon (rising third- and fourth-graders) and 1 to 3 p.m. (rising fifth- and sixth-graders); July 7, 10 a.m. to noon (rising first- and second-graders) and 1 to 3 p.m. (rising third- and fourth-graders); July 9, 10 a.m. to noon (rising first- and second-graders) and 1 to 3 p.m. (rising third- and fourth-graders); July 14, 10 a.m. to noon (rising fifth- to sixth-graders) and 1 to 3 p.m. (rising first- and second-graders); July 16, 10 a.m. to noon (rising fifth- to sixth-graders) and 1 to 3 p.m. (rising first- and second-graders); July 21, 10 a.m. to noon (rising first- and second-graders) and 1 to 3 p.m. (rising third- and fourth-graders); and July 23, 10 a.m. to noon (rising first- and second-graders) and 1 to 3 p.m. (rising third- and fourth-graders).

Cost is $30 per two-hour session, and students who attend Monday and Wednesday of the same week will participate in related but independent lessons, back to back.

According to Forrester, one child per session will attend for free, based upon the recommendation of a teacher or mentor and thanks to a contribution from Woodland’s Barbecue. Nominations, which will be kept confidential, should include the child’s name, school attended, grade level entering, why the child should receive a scholarship and whether or not the child should be considered based on financial need. Contact information for the person nominating and the parents should also be included. Completed forms may be sent to (brainfoodboone@gmail.com) For more information, visit http://brainfoodboone.wix.com/brainfoodboone#!summer-enrichment/cwmu.



And More

Is your camp not listed here? No problem! Email (frank@mountaintimes.com) with information about your program, including times, dates, description and age range, to be included in a future issue.

Additional Images

Kyle Scannell of Greensboro carefully makes his way across a rope on the Discovery Course with Rock Dimensions.
File photo

Camp Mountaintop Discovery offers campers a venue for self-discovery, relationship building, community awareness, outdoor adventure and developing a healthy lifestyle.
Photo submitted

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